You are here : Home > BIG > miR-940 a potential biomarker of breast cancer

Highlight | Biomarkers | Cancer

miR-940 a potential biomarker of breast cancer




​​​​​MicroRNAs are non-coding RNAs that can regulate the expression of several genes. Several operate as oncogenes or tumor suppressors. Researchers at the Large Scale Biology laboratory have identified one of them as a potential biomarker for breast cancer.​​

Published on 30 March 2015
​miRNAs are key regulators of gene expression. By binding to many genes, they create a complex network of gene co-regulation.

Researchers at the Large Scale Biology laboratory present here a target-based miRNA network construction and its analysis. Using different network-based approaches, they first identified two miRNA hub groups in the network, by their close connections and common targets. In one cluster containing three miRNAs, miR-612, miR-661 and miR-940, the annotated functions of the co-regulated genes suggested a role in small GTPase signalling. While confirming this hypothesis and although the three members of this cluster targeted same subsets of predicted genes, researchers showed that their overexpression still impacted cell fate differently. Indeed, miR-661 demonstrated enhanced phosphorylation of myosin II and an increase in cell invasion, indicating a potential oncogenic function. On the contrary, miR-612 and miR-940 inhibited phosphorylation of myosin II and cell invasion suggesting a potential tumour suppressor role.
Confirming these results, miR-940 was further found consistently downregulated in breast cancer tissues.




Top page